Unnecessary Biceps Surgeries Caused by an Improper Diagnosis can be New York Medical Malpractice

We all know where out biceps muscles are—welcome to the gun show!  Defined biceps are sought by everyone, and large, muscular biceps are a sign of masculinity and power for a man.  The bigger and better, the more impressive!  However, these muscles are supposed by tendons which are be frail and rip.  Even the most “jacked” and muscular of bodybuilders can have their biceps tear leaving their arm useless.  This requires an emergency surgery to fix the damage.


This is because the tendons require a quick diagnosis and repair otherwise the torn tendon will not work as properly as before.  This is because damage and scar tissue can interfere with how the tendon works.  This means that even the largest of biceps will no longer be strong and work the same.  This can be a big problem for a laborer or someone who has a very physical job.

 

The proper way to diagnose a torn biceps is with an MRI.  Even though some torn biceps will look very obvious, like a “popeye” bulge, this does not always mean the biceps is torn.  Sometimes even the biceps can just stretch and pull.  This could make it look like the biceps is torn because it will bunch up, but that does not mean that it is damaged.  The biceps tendon, if stretched could likely remain stretched for a while, but it will likely come back a little bit back to a more normal length.

 

Some doctors will fail to notice that the biceps tendon is not torn but it is just stretched.  This happens when they do not do an MRI and just do a physical examination and decide that the tendon is torn.  This is still damage to the tendon, but it means surgery is not absolutely necessary and an emergency.  Rather, the surgery would be helpful, but not urgent or required.

 

If a surgeon does this surgery without confirming it on an MRI, it can absolutely be medical malpractice.  This is because it will be an unnecessary surgery.  It can also result in further injury to the arm, biceps, and nerves.  Sometimes a stretched biceps tendon can come back to normal, other times it is just a little pull.  If a patient goes through the surgery, it can be months out of work and in recovery.  It can cause much more harm than good.

 

But what do you think?  I would love to hear from you!  Leave a comment or I also welcome your phone call on my toll-free cell at 1-866-889-6882 or you can drop me an e-mail at [email protected]  You are always welcome to request my FREE book, The Seven Deadly Mistakes of Malpractice Victims, at the home page of my website at www.protectingpatientrights.com.

 
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